Chad Orzel


Chad Orzel is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Union College in Schenectady, NY (where the ideas come from).  He also runs the weblog "Uncertain Principles" as part of the ScienceBlogs collective, where he posts regularly about physics, politics, pop culture, and anything else that seems interesting.  He was a graduate student at the University of Maryland, where he worked in the group of William Phillips, who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics.  In 1998, he spent about three months working in a research lab outside of Tokyo, and has been looking for an excuse to come back to Japan ever since.  He lives in Niskayuna, NY, with his wife, Kate Nepveu, and their dog Emmy, the Queen of Niskayuna.


Web Site

Blog


DayTimeTitleDescriptionParticipants
Fri1400How Much Science Should SF Contain?Hugo Gernsback created SF to teach science. Should this be a foundational idea for SF or is it a horrible error? Why do we care whether the science is right even when the story is good? Much of SF seems to get along quite nicely with no discernable reality in its science althogh there is the occasional piece accorded masterpiece status *because* of its science content. Is the issue the technical details or is it a general approach to the universe that is important? Chad ORZEL, David M. SILVER, Gregory BENFORD, Stanley SCHMIDT
Mon1000Blogging and Live Journals in SFBlogging (and related activities) are having an impact on the world at large, and the SF community in particular. Blogs tell us more about the people in the field, the way the field works, and who is who -- and at a pace and a distribution that few if any fanzines ever matched. Blogs influence the directions of our community, can impact awards by making works or their creators better known, and perhaps even influence the works being created. Or is the impact overstated, as all things net related seem to be? Can writers use blogs to market themselves? Are blogs a way to engage the community? And is this true worldwide, or is it just an US-centric fad? Or even the English speaking world?Adam RAKUNAS, Chad ORZEL, Yoshio KOBAYASHI, Patrick NIELSEN HAYDEN, Paul CORNELL